Response #4

It seems like there are more and more people talking about privacy with internet usage. Ian Bogost writes an article called “What Is ‘Evil’ to Google” and he explains what he thinks is wrong with Google. Kieron O’Hara writes an article called “Are We Getting Privacy the Wrong Way Round” also speaks about the privacy issues we are having with the internet. The last article called “Big Data: are we making a big mistake” by Tim Harford, also goes onto speak about the things that the internet is doing with privacy and the future of the internet.
In the article “What Is ‘Evil’ TO Google” speaks about how Google’s slogan of “don’t be evil” has no other merit than to reassure themselves that they are doing what is right for the internet and its users. As the article states there is no judge for what is considered “evil” yet it would seem that in looking out for the best interest of your users selling their personal information can not be right. Google finds a way in which to justify their actions by stating it in bold lettering and not hiding their actions from the users. Which leaves us to believe they are not wrong because what says that these actions are truly evil or wrong.
In Big Data we are able to see how that information collected by Google can be used to collect data quickly and processed to assist the greater community. Although this data comes quickly and yields results quickly it lacks essential information needed to further investigate the causes of the data that search engines can’t produce. It gives you information based on people you are friends with or on what you have bought from certain places. The author gives an example of a man and his daughter, and his daughter receiving things about pregnancy. The father fought, until he found out she was truly pregnant.
In the article by O’Hara, the author writes about how you should not put your personal information on the internet. Things like credit card information, nude pictures, and other things that we should keep private. O’Hara basically goes against everything that the first two articles spoke about.

Bogost, Ian. “What Is ‘Evil’ to Google?” The Atlantic. October 15 2013

Harford, Tim. “Big Data: Are We Making a Big Mistake?” Financial Times. March 28 2014.

O’Hara, Kieron. “Are we Getting Privacy the Wrong Way Round?” IEEE Internet Computing 17.4 (2013): 89-92.

Response #3

Edward Ayers writes an article called “Does Digital Scholarships Have a Future” where he questions the future of digital scholarships. Dr. Ayers believes that the majority of the scholarly world has no desire to journey into the unknown realm of digital scholarship. Due to the unchanging infrastructure of academia professors and scholars have no real push to differ from their usual ways of researching, studying, exploring, or writing. Digital scholarship does offer a quicker return on publication as well as scholarly articles being viewed at a quicker pace but it is still chartering the unknown. It is unclear if the pros outweigh the cons of digital scholarship, in an arena where things have been the same for so long. It will take labs such at the University of Richmond and other universities continuing to break new ground in digital scholarship and showing the benefits and the opportunities to grow academia that it brings with it.
Dr. Ripley “Introduction” fights a little of what Dr. Ayers is saying in his research. In which Dr. Ripley believes that in order for to break new ground, scholars should go out into the field and do their own research,and not just getting information off the internet reading each others articles.
Its important to bring new information to students. Both Dr. Ayers and Dr. Ripley make valid arguments in thinking that something new needs to be done, whether that new information is found by going out into the field and gathering data, or using digital scholarship to enhance the discipline.

References
Ayers, E. L. (2013, August 5). Does digital scholarship have a future? Educause Review. Retrieved September 14, 2014, from http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/does-digital-scholarship-have-future

Ripley, S. D. (1966). [Introduction]. In Knowledge among men: Eleven essays on science, culture, and society commemorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of James Smithson. New York: Published by Simon and Schuster in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution, Washington.

More Data Leads to the World’s Destruction

The next big thing is always around the corner. We as humans have become comfortable to a point that we are never satisfied. With supply and demand needs, we believe in getting our supplies as soon as we make the demand. Rather it be with phones, cars or even video games we live in the era of now. We want the latest and greatest everything in a matter of “seconds”. Look at phones, even if we bought a new phone a couple of months ago, we will see or hear about a newer phone and instantly want it.
In the book Big Data, written by Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier, discuss the importance of big data and also the fear of big data. They speak on a variety of issues in which technology has helped and harmed us. In chapter 1 they introduce how data has evolved and allowed itself to be such a necessity for getting information at a much faster and accurate pace. The authors write, “The authors explained how Google could ‘predict’ the spread of the winter flu in the United States, not just nationally, but down to specific regions and even states” (2). The authors were speaking of engineers that wrote in the scientific journal called Nature. The authors go on to explain how the engineers were able to access this information, “The company could achieve this by looking at what people were searching for on the Internet” (2). This is where the Internet can be a dangerous tool in the wrong hands, and maybe still be dangerous in the right hands. The thought that the Internet can serve as “Big Brother” and watch our every move is frightening beyond imagination.
We are moving too fast for our own good. We are at the point that we are giving up our rights and freedoms to the fear of what technology has offered us and corrupted our minds with. If you look at the Patriot Act, and look at the United States Amendments, you will find that the Patriot Act voids out the Fourth Amendment. The Fourth Amendment prohibits unreasonable search and seizures and must have a warrant to enter your property. The Patriot Act allows government agencies to search your property without a warrant on the beliefs that you are masterminding terrorist activities. The government agencies view your Internet usage, tap through phone call, text messages, and any other data that raises suspicion. I believe that data should be limited and not overused or abused by anyone. When taking a glance at the table of contents in Big Data those words the author uses for the titles have a much deeper meaning after reading the book. The authors do a great job of explain “Big Data” to those that don’t fully understand its powers, but also views its strengths.

Mayer-Schönberger, V., & Cukier, K. (2013). Big data: A revolution that will transform how we live, work, and think. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

USA PATRIOT Act. (n.d.). Retrieved October 2, 2014, from http://www.fincen.gov/statutes_regs/patriot/

The United States Constitution – The U.S. Constitution Online – USConstitution.net. (n.d.). Retrieved October 2, 2014, from http://www.usconstitution.net/const.html

Education: The New Facade of Segregation

Education: The New Façade of Segregation
Looking back at the white only restrooms, white only restaurants, white owned business, and white only schools, in the 1950’s, one would think as human-beings we would have socially graduated to new heights. As we enter into 2015, black people are still poverty stricken, uneducated and segregated in comparison not only to whites, but other minorities as well. Blacks are being isolated by invisible “Redlines” that keep blacks in their own area, and not allowing them the opportunity to reach the great “American Dream” that so many other races are allowed to reach. Which raises the question why are black people stagnant in education? Education is more than just the key to success, but it is also the door that needs to be opened for all races to walk through and rejoice in the gratitude of success.
Many blacks are failing going forward to succeed, not because they are lazy or unwilling to learn. They fall short because they are constantly exiled and forced to live in the worst places in America. They have to rise from ghettos, crack houses, single parent households, and uneducated parents, teenage mothers raising kids, incarcerated fathers, and teachers not wanting to teach the kids of the ghetto. Richard Rothstein author of “Why Our Schools Are Segregated” writes about the disadvantages blacks have while they try to pursue success. He says, “Children in impoverished neighborhoods are surrounded by more crime and violence and suffer from stress that interferes with learning.” (51). With all the issues outside of the classroom, how are blacks supposed to be focused on education, when they don’t know if they will be alive to see tomorrow, or if they will eat dinner, or if one of their relatives got caught in the ghetto trifecta (ghetto trifecta: die, sent to prison, or strung out on drugs). Rothstein continues by saying, “When few parents have strong educations themselves, schools cannot benefit from parental pressure for a high-quality curriculum. Children have few college-educated role models to emulate and few peers whose families set high academic standards.” (51). When you have uneducated parents, it is hard to teach kids. It is hard because the parents do not understand what is coming home with the children as far as homework, studying for test, or preparing for the next day. They also fail because the lack of attention a lot of black kids receive. The lack of attention can come from many things, but one of the reasons is there are so many single parent households. There are a lot of single black mothers trying to raise 2, 3 or sometimes 4 kids.
To think of segregation, one most know and understand the definition to segregate. The definition, according to dictionary.com, segregate means to separate or set apart from others or from the main body or group; to require, often with force, the separation of (a specific racial, religious, or other group) from general body of society. Sheryll Cashin, author of “Place not Race: A New Vision of Opportunity in America” describes poverty for blacks and reasons why they are not being educated properly. Cashin writes, “Neighborhoods with high poverty, limited employment, underperforming schools, distressed housing, and violent crime depress life outcomes.” (24). Cashin goes onto say this about the disadvantages that blacks are up against when she says, “They create a closed loop of systemic disadvantage such that failure is common and success aberrational.” (24). It is expected for blacks to fail, and remain in poverty. Some are allowed to reach success to a certain degree, however, most are held down to remain right where they have always been, which then allows the cycle to continue. Uneducated kids, leads to irresponsible parents, that go on to raise more uneducated kids living in low income housing (aka “the ghetto”)
It is no longer accepted to say blacks are being segregated, but when looking at things like redlining Richmond http://dsl.richmond.edu/holc/ you see that blacks are segregated, pushed and kept in the ghettos, and are not being allowed to move out. It’s sad to see a race be held down, but it’s extremely sad to see a race be held down and pushed under the rug so that no sees the true dirt being hidden.

Rothstein, R. (2013). Why our schools are segregated. Educational Leadership, 70(8), 50-55.

Redlining Richmond. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://dsl.richmond.edu/holc/

(n.d.). Retrieved September 27, 2014, from http://dictionary.reference.com/

Cashin, S. (2014). Place, not race: A new vision of opportunity in America.

A Minorities Hypoyhesis

Tony Moore
Knowledge Management
A Minorities Hypothesis
Why are Black Americans at the bottom of the bottom when it comes to education?
Dixon-Roman, E. J., Everson, H. T., and McArdle, J. J. (2013). Role, poverty and SAT scores: Modeling the influences of family income on black and white high school students’ SAT performance. Teachers College Record. 115(4), 1-33.
In this article, the authors focus on the importance of testing such as SAT scores, and how it is different in poverty stricken minorities. They touch on subjects like the importance of income with families, and how it could effect a college education. I am looking to use this article, because it makes me ask the question of why Blacks do not receive the tools to further their education, which leads to a cycle of people that don’t move up in social class. I’m looking to use this article to back my argument that blacks are not given the tools needed to help them pull through to success.
Nunnally, S., and Carter, N. (2012). Moving from Victims to victors: African American attitudes on the ‘culture of poverty’ and black blame. Journal of African American Studies, 16(3), 423-455. doi:10.1007/s12111-011-9197-7
This article is a piece written in response to Bill Cosby’s speech, in which he spoke about poverty and the bigger picture of the issues surrounding blacks. This article brings in a psychological aspect of the failure of blacks and the lack of discipline they have. It also speaks on ways in which blacks can overcome the situations they have been given. This article will help me answer the solution to the problems dealing with the lack of education blacks are getting and also introduce the elements that are not seen that pull blacks into the slums and continue to keep them there.
Blackwell, E., and Pinder, P. (2014). What are the motivational factors of first-generation minority college students who overcome their family histories to pursue higher education?. College Student Journal, 48(1), 45-56.
The authors speak about the importance of higher education, the reasoning behind wanting to further ones education, and why minorities are not getting the opportunity to further their education. The article allows one to view the problem of minorities with a higher education, and the issues and problems it took for them just to reach that monument. It also looks at the importance of these first-generation minority college students struggle and strength to be where they are. I am looking to us this article to let people get a better view of the struggle it takes to get a higher education among blacks.
Saporito, S., and Sohoni, D. (2007). Mapping educational inequality: Concentrations of poverty among poor minorities’ students in public schools. Social Forces. 85(3), 1227-1253.
This article talks about the importance of a high school education, and how minority students are falling short of getting a high school education to push them to the next level of success in their life. I wanted to use this article to help find ways to change education to help kids see with poverty adapt t other changes they need to make to compete and seek further education.
Nichols-Casebolt, A. M. (1988). Black families headed by single mothers: Growing numbers and increasing poverty. Social Work,33(4), 306-313.
With the high number of single black mothers, and uneducated black kids, the author correlates how the two play a role in black communities. The author also speaks about how it effects children’s growth and education in the kids. The author takes a broader look at what the impact of single mothers have on their children, and how the outcome is usually negative. I plan on using this article to touch on the unknown state of 80’s babies. Single black women dealing with the hardships of drugs, incarceration of fathers, and living in the ghetto.
Jackson, A. P. (1994). The effects of role strain on single, working, black mothers perceptions of their young children. Social Work Research, 18(1), 36-40.
This is an older article, however, the author still makes points that are relevant to today’s single black mothers raising kids with no intent of furthering themselves. The author speaks about the upbringing of children and how important it is for that child. I want to use this article to view how things have not changed with single black women, black kids and the lack of upbringing due to lack of knowledge.
Closson, R. B., Bowman, L., and Merriweather, L. R. (2014). Toward race pedagogy for black faculty. Adult Learning, 25(3), 82-88.
This article goes into the teaching ways of black and whites. The author argues with which method is better. The authors grasp facts about black teachers struggling teaching black students, and how students react to the teachers. I want to use this article to show how the different teaching skills learned by teachers are not being given, nor used with black students.
Hartyney, M. T., and Flavin, P. (2014). The political foundations of the black-white education achievement gap. American Politics Research, 42(1), 3-33.
With some being blind by the facts that there is still a gap between races dealing with education, this article goes into some detail of how the effects have taken place. Looking at it in a more political way, I think this article will raise the questions of how and why the gap between blacks and everyone became so dramatic after equality was supposed to be in place.
Ruffins, P. (2014). Beyond black and white. Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 31(3), 40-44.
In the early years it was all about affirmative action, equal rights for jobs, and equality as people. Looking at those values they seem to be very harsh and blunt. This article speaks about affirmative action in the sense of education and social class. How segregation is in today’s times and how the educational gap plays a major role. I want this article to help with looking at how segregation impedes the learning process for blacks.
Waks, L. J. (2005) Brown v. broad, common citizenship, and the limits of curriculum. Journal of Cirriculum and Supervision, 20(2), 94-128.
This article touches on Brown vs. Board of Education, and how in many ways things are still the same, if not worse as they were 50 years ago. The true overlook of this article brings together strong facts about the gap between blacks and the rest of the races in Americans. Bringing to date how far apart it truly is as far as an educational aspect is concerned. I want to use this article to bring full circle what my point is about blacks and the lack of education they are receiving in order to succeed.

Annotated Bibliography

Tony Moore

Knowledge Management

Annotated Bibliography

Dixon-Roman, E. J., Everson, H. T., and McArdle, J. J. (2013).Role, Poverty and SAT scores: Modeling the Influences of Family Income on Black and White High School Students’ SAT Performance. Teachers College Record. 1-33.

In this article the authors focus on the importance of White and Black SAT scores and how it is different for poverty stricken minorities. They talk about the importance of income with families and how it could effect a college education. The questions of interest for me was looking at the differences on a broad scale of how poverty and lack of tools for blacks effect study skills and further education, which leads to lack of moving up in their social status.

Nunnally, S., & Carter, N. (2012). Moving from Victims to Victors: African American Attitudes on the ‘Culture of Poverty’ and Black Blame. Journal of African American Studies16(3), 423-455.

This article is a piece written about Bill Cosby’s speech talking about poverty and the bigger picture of issues with blacks. This piece brings a psychological aspect of the failure of blacks and the lack of discipline blacks have. It also speaks about the upcoming of blacks and how they can overcome the situations they have been given.

BLACKWELL, E., & PINDER, P. (2014). WHAT ARE THE MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS OF FIRST-GENERATION MINORITY COLLEGE STUDENTS WHO OVERCOME THEIR FAMILY HISTORIES TO PURSUE HIGHER EDUCATION?.College Student Journal48(1), 45-56.

The author speaks about the importance of higher education, the reasoning behind wanting to further ones education, and why minorities are not getting the opportunity to further their education. The article allows you to view the problem of minorities with a higher education, yet still treated below average to others getting their degrees. It also looks at the importance of these first generation college students to go to college in their families.

Saporito, S., & Sohoni, D. (2007). Mapping Educational Inequality: Concentrations of Poverty among Poor and Minority Students in Public Schools. Social Forces85(3), 1227-1253.

This article touches on the importance of a high school education, and how minority students are falling short of getting an high school education to push them to the next level of success in their life. The questions which I asked when reading this article was how to change a kids education to help them see and learn to adapt to the things being thrown their way to distract them from seeking further education?

Nichols-Casebolt, A. M. (1988). Black Families Headed by Single Mothers: Growing Numbers and Increasing Poverty. Social Work33(4), 306-313.

With the high number of single black mothers, uneducated black kids, the author correlates how the two play a role in black communities. How they also effect education and growth in kids. The authors also look at the broader picture of what impact single black mothers have their children, and how the outcome is usually negative.

Jackson, A. P. (1994). The effects of role strain on single, working, black mothers’ perceptions of their young children. Social Work Research18(1), 36-40.

This is an older article; however the author still makes points that are relevant to today’s single black mothers raising kids. The upbringing of a child, rather black, white or Hispanic is highly important. The author goes into detail of why the upbringing of a child is so important, and why it is harder for these single black mothers to bring up kids in poverty stricken neighborhoods.

Closson, R. B., Bowman, L., & Merriweather, L. R. (2014). Toward a Race Pedagogy for Black Faculty. Adult Learning25(3), 82-88.

This article goes into the teaching ways of black and white teachers. The authors argue which method is better. What’s so different about how a different race teaches kids? The author argues that blacks struggle to teach their race. This article takes a look into the teachers and how the students react to them, instead of vice versa.

Hartney, M. T., & Flavin, P. (2014). The Political Foundations of the Black–White Education Achievement Gap. American Politics Research42(1), 3-33.

With some being blind by the fact that there is a gap between races dealing with education, this article goes into some detail of how the effects have taken place. Some of the questions that arise for me are more why there is such a gap between races? Why was this gap allowed to be built? The authors take a look into the issue in a more political way, and try to educate the reader one the issues.
Ruffins, P. (2014). Beyond Black and White. Diverse: Issues in Higher Education31(3), 40-44.

In the early years it was all about affirmative action, equal rights for jobs, and equality as people. Looking at those values they seem to be very harsh and blunt. In this article the author speaks about affirmative action in the sense of education and social class. How segregation is in today’s times and how the educational gap plays a major role.

Waks, L. J. (2005). BROWN V. BOARD, COMMON CITIZENSHIP, AND THE LIMITS OF CURRICULUM. Journal Of Curriculum & Supervision20(2), 94-128.

This article touches on Brown vs. Board of Education, and how in many ways things are still the same, if not worse as they were 50 years ago. The true overlook of this article brings together strong facts about the gap between blacks and the rest of the races in America. Bringing to date how far apart it truly is as far as an educational aspect there is.

What Do You Prefer? Assignment #2

It seems that there are a trillion studies on what reader’s prefer to read on between paper books or electronically books (e-books). What do you prefer? Something that is bright always lit, you can carry 5,000 books on one device, or do you prefer to touch the pages as you go through your book, smell the pages, write foot notes, and become pulled in by the author as you begin to connect deeply with the characters? Can you really accurately do a study on what people prefer to read on?
Brandon Keim writes Why the Smart Reading Device of the Future May Be… Paper, expresses that if you want a better connection with the piece you’re reading, then you might want to get a hard copy book. It does make sense in a way to believe that the futures reading tool would be good old, reliable paper. How can paper be the new old wave of reading? Keim believes that, “paper is a technology uniquely suited for imbibing novels and essays and complex narratives”. This may have some truth to it. Keim may have a point. I don’t know what it is, however, your brain just receives more it seems when reading a book on paper. For me for example, I cannot read a text book on the computer. I constantly lose track of where I am reading, and the material may be something that interests me a lot, but reading it on the computer completely takes away from the subject for me. Keim states that kids prefer textbooks over computers, but he does not have anything to back up what he says. He says, “research finds” but there is no source.
Ferris Jabr writes an article called Why the Brain Prefers Paper. Jabr gives examples of why screens are not good for reading. He has some valid points; however, he too does not say who did the research or the overall outcome of the research. Both Keim and Jabr agree that reading books on paper is overall the better way to go. Things the web is good for are things like blogs, social media, and the opportunity to get product out that other ways wouldn’t be seen or heard.